holistic
holistic
holistic
holistic
holistic
holistic
holistic
holistic

"Busting Multiple Intelligences Myths" holistic

holistic
"Three Positive Ways to Apply Multiple Intelligences Theory in Schools"
by Barbara Pearson
Reprinted from ArtLinks, October/November 1998

(An summary of Howard Gardner's principle ideas)

1. Cultivate important life skills
Schools should cultivate those skills and capacities that are valued in the community and the broader society. Some of these desired roles are likely to highlight specific intelligences, including ones that have traditionally been given short shrift in the schools. For example, success in the workplace, which requires team problem solving skills, depends on the development of the interpersonal intelligence.

2. Approach a subject in a variety of ways
Attempting to cover too much material results in superficial understanding. Gardner believes it makes more sense to spend a significant amount of time on key concepts and essential questions and ideas, and approach them in a variety of ways. This is where the arts play a significant role, as they give teachers and students many rich languages through which to express what they know. Teaching using the arts and MI theory results in a number of desirable outcomes. More children will be reached, and they will be able to display their understanding--and their problem areas--in ways that are comfortable for them and accessible to others.

3. Individualize teaching and learning
Multiple Intelligences theory endorses a group of propositions many teachers have always believed: we are not all the same; we do not have the same kinds of minds; and education works most effectively if these differences are taken into account rather than denied or ignored. Any uniform educational approach is likely to serve only a minority of children.

holistic